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Hearing impairment in children following bacterial meningitis; assessed with brainstem auditory evoked response (BSAER)

Authors:

SS Jayasinghe ,

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle and Clinical Neuroscience Center, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Galle, LK
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KD Pathirana,

Clinical Neuroscience Center, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Galle, LK
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GTHIP Vimalasena,

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, LK
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D Tharanga

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ruhuna, Galle, LK
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Abstract

Background: Bacterial meningitis is one of the most serious infections occurring in children. Sensorineural hearing loss is the commonest complication of bacterial meningitis.

Materials and Methods: We aimed to assess the level of hearing in children following bacterial meningitis. Retrospective study was conducted. The data were traced from April 2007 through August 2010 with the existing reports kept in the Clinical Neuroscience Center of the children following bacterial meningitis. Brainstem auditory evoked response (BSAER) was used to assess the level of hearing. The stimulation intensities of 90dB, 60dB and 30dB were given to each ear separately. The occurrence of wave V was considered as effective conduction of stimulus to the auditory cortex.

Results: There were 30 (17 males) children following bacterial meningitis. All were below the age of five years. Eight children had meningitis during their neonatal period and five children 1-2 months of age, respectively. Seven required Intensive Care and four were ventilated. Sixteen (53.3%) children had normal hearing. BSEAR of eight (27%) children did not show wave V in one of the sides to the stimulation intensity of 30dB. Three (10%) did not have wave V in both sides to the stimulation intensity of 30dB. Four (13%) had unilateral hearing loss to the stimulation intensity of 60dB. Two (6%) children did not have wave V bilaterally to the stimulation intensity of 90 dB.

Conclusion: Out of the children referred for BSEAR after meningitis, 47% had post meningitic hearing impairment. It is important to do BSEAR of all the children following bacterial meningitis to identify hearing impairment without delay.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4038/gmj.v17i1.4353

Galle Medical Journal, Vol 17: No. 1, March 2012 1-4

How to Cite: Jayasinghe, S. et al., (2012). Hearing impairment in children following bacterial meningitis; assessed with brainstem auditory evoked response (BSAER). Galle Medical Journal. 17(1), pp.1–4. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/gmj.v17i1.4353
Published on 29 May 2012.
Peer Reviewed

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