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ESBL producing Escherichia coli prevalence in chicken stools in selected broiler farms in Galle district

Authors:

R. M. C. S. Karunarathna,

University of Ruhuna, LK
About R. M. C. S.
Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences
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W. M. D. G. B. Wijayaratne ,

University of Ruhuna, LK
About W. M. D. G. B.
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine
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H. A. Ubeysekara

Ministry of Health, LK
About H. A.
Provincial Director of Health Office Southern Province
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Abstract

Introduction: Most of the animals reared for food are reservoirs for Extended Spectrum Beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing coliforms. ESBL producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) in chicken meat are increasing worldwide. Since the consumption of chicken in meals is higher compared to other livestock in Sri Lanka, there is a threat to transmit these organisms to humans via food. The aim of this study was to determine the ESBL producing E. coli prevalence in chicken stools and the presence of antibacterial substances in chicken feed and water in selected broiler farms in Galle district

 

Methods: Eighty stool samples were collected from selected broiler farms in Galle district. Isolates were confirmed as E. coli on the lactose fermentation, colony morphology, Gram staining and biochemical tests. ESBL production was detected according to the CLSI double disc diffusion method. Ready to serve chicken feed and water samples were collected and tested against two types of E. coli control cultures using agar well diffusion method to detect the effects of any antibacterial substances.

 

Results: Eighty-six different types of E. coli were isolated from 80 chicken stool samples. There were no ESBL producers among all isolated E coli. There was no antibacterial activity demonstrated in food or water served for chicken except for in one farm. The percentage distribution of fecal microbial flora as well as their density was altered in the farm where antibiotics were used in chicken feed.

 

Conclusions: No ESBL producing E. coli were detected in chicken stool in the selected broiler farms of Galle district indicating the minimum risk of transmission of ESBLs to the human via consumption of chicken meat.
How to Cite: Karunarathna, R.M.C.S., Wijayaratne, W.M.D.G.B. and Ubeysekara, H.A., 2022. ESBL producing Escherichia coli prevalence in chicken stools in selected broiler farms in Galle district. Galle Medical Journal, 27(1), pp.11–17. DOI: http://doi.org/10.4038/gmj.v27i1.8073
Published on 02 Aug 2022.
Peer Reviewed

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